FAQs

Q: What are the potential penalties for my alleged crime?

A: Indiana law provides different penalties for different types of offenses, divided into felonies and misdemeanors. Their penalties are:

  • Murder: 45-65 years in state prison, $10,000 fine
  • Level 1 Felony: 20-40 years in state prison, $10,000 fine
  • Level 2 Felony: 10-30 years in state prison, $10,000 fine
  • Level 3 Felony: 3-16 years in state prison, $10, 000 fine
  • Level 4 Felony: 2-12 years in state prison, $10,000 fine
  • Level 5 Felony: 1-6 years in state prison, $10,000 fine
  • Level 6 Felony: 6 months-2 years, six months in state prison, $10,000 fine
  • Class A Misdemeanor: 0-365 days in county jail, $5,000 fine
  • Class B Misdemeanor: 0-180 days in county jail, $1,000 fine
  • Class C Misdemeanor: 0-60 days in county jail, $500 fine

There may be additional penalties, too, such as restitution to any victims, or suspension of your driving privileges.

Q: What is the statute of limitations for my case?

A: A statute of limitations is the time limit that the State has to file criminal charges against a person who is believed to have committed a crime. The statute of limitations for a misdemeanor offense is two years, and the statute of limitations for a Level 3-6 Felony is five years. Murder, Level 1 Felonies, and Level 2 Felonies have no statute of limitations. There are also a few special exceptions to this general rule for certain types of sex offenses, forgeries, and offenses where DNA is a major identifying factor.

Q: Will a warrant for my arrest ever expire?

A: No. A re-arrest warrant for failing to appear in court or for violating your probation will never expire once issued. The only way that you will be able to have that warrant resolved is to return to the county that issued it and deal with the underlying case that led to the warrant being issued.

Q: If I can’t afford an attorney, will I get one for free?

A: Under the constitutions of the United States and the state of Indiana, you are entitled to an attorney at no cost to yourself at every stage of a criminal proceeding. Attorneys that are appointed to represent you under those circumstances are referred to as “Public Defenders.” There is nothing wrong with using a Public Defender, but you need to be aware that any Public Defender may be working on up to one hundred other cases in addition to yours. This means that you may have difficulty in speaking with your attorney outside of court settings, and important information that you need to pass along may not reach your attorney. Being charged with a criminal offense may result in the loss of your liberty, and you should make a rational decision about who to hire, rather than going with the cheapest option. “You get what you pay for” is very important to remember when talking about your freedom.

Q: How much do you charge for your services?

A: We charge a flat fee for our services, based on the type of offense that a person has been charged with, and the type of work that we’re being asked to perform, such as a simple plea bargain or a full jury trial. We would encourage you to contact us so that we can discuss your case, and determine what the appropriate fee for our services would be.

Q: What forms of payment do you accept?

A: We accept cash, money order, certified checks, personal checks, Visa, MasterCard, and Discover. We can also work out a payment plan for you, if necessary.

Q: Do you take all types of criminal cases?

A: Yes. We can represent you on any felony or misdemeanor charge that you have been accused of committing in the state of Indiana.

Q: Are criminal cases the only type of cases that you take?

A: The major focus of our practice is criminal defense, but we encourage you to contact us with any legal questions that you might have. If it’s something that we can’t help you with, we will do our best to point you in the right direction.

9.6Joseph Robert Delamater
Joseph Robert DelamaterReviewsout of 10 reviews
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